Deciding which type of fabric to make an item with is an important decision, as fabrics can have countless qualities. From natural to synthetic fibers and from knit to woven, here’s a look at different fabric types and how to identify them.Here is the list of 3 innovative fabrics that can shape the textile and fashion industry

1. Pinatex -From Pinapple

Pinatex -From Pinapple

This fascinating material requires no additional water or chemicals to make because it comes from waste products – the leftover leaves from pineapple trees. An estimated 40,000 tons of leaves are generated annually, most of which are burned or left to rot. Fibers are extracted from leaves and turned into a non-woven textile that's an excellent leather alternative. One might argue it's better than plastic-based vegan leathers because it's biodegradable and not made from fossil fuels

  • Pinatex © Pinatex This fascinating material requires no additional water or chemicals to make because it comes from waste products – the leftover leaves from pineapple trees.
  • Designers like Pinatex because it comes in a roll, reducing the waste created by irregularly-shaped animal hides.

2. NEFFA/MycoTEX - From Mushroom

NEFFA/MycoTEX - From Mushroom Source: TreeHugger

Swatches of fabric grown from mushroom mycelium More peculiar than pineapple fibers, MycoTEX is fabric grown from mushroom mycelium. Mycelium is the “vegetative part of a mushroom, consisting of a network of fine white filaments” (dictionary). Dutch designer Aniela Hoitink came up with the idea of ‘growing' a garment from the living product, after observing soft-bodied species that grow by replicating themselves over and over again following a modular pattern. 

3. eucalyptus Yarn

eucalyptus Yarn

Wool and the Gang Knitting company Wool & the Gang has launched a new yarn called Tina Tape Yarn , made from eucalyptus trees. Fibers are harvested, pulped, and turned into yarn, which home-knitters can now purchase. The resulting yarn is technically Tencel, a.k.a. lyocell, in deconstructed form. (treehugger.com)

Tencel tends to have a good environmental reputation, as it's made in a closed-loop system that recycles water and solvent, but there's been relatively little study. The New York Times had very little to say in a recent article on sustainable fabrics: 

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